r/AskUK 4d ago

Things That You Think Will Die With Older People?

Was thinking about the stuff my parents do that I don't do and probably won't ever do.

A good one is putting one of those little soapy cages on the toilet bowl (does anyone under 40 do this?).

Cooking meat until it's horribly over done.

Using lard.

Recording TV to watch later.

Leaving the house at 3am to "make the most of the first day of holiday".

2.6k Upvotes

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6.5k

u/chainedtomato 4d ago Gold Starry Tearing Up I'm Deceased

Being able to retire

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u/iambeherit 4d ago

87 is a perfectly reasonable age to stop working.

Best year still ahead.

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u/Complete_Vehicle1749 4d ago

You have 87 upvotes I would toss another but it’s too perfect.

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u/SyeCatPath 4d ago

Toss an upvote to your redditor oh vally o plenty

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u/Feral_scientist88 4d ago edited 3d ago

“Ah interesting question, lemme scroll down and read some funny comm…”

SMASHES AGAINST SAD TRUTH

“I’ll close Reddit for today”

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u/Seamus_McBurly 4d ago

This hurt

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u/JasonVoorhees3 4d ago

I'm 38 and literally just bought a 'soapy cage thingy' last week! Makes all the difference eradicating smells from the badezimmer

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u/2023mustgo 4d ago

I’m your age and I use them too, who knew wanting a fresh smelling toilet was an old person thing! Although now I’m worrying about the single use plastic…

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u/Ok_Inspector4190 4d ago

You can get those jelly ones that stick to the inside of the toilet bowl

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u/Chuck-0-matic 4d ago

They don't last as long and come in a plastic applicator.

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u/Unhappy-Common 4d ago

The applicator is reusable and mine last 2-4 weeks depending on how much use the toilet is getting (guests, visitors, upset tummies etc). No plastic inside the toilet for germs to grow on.

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u/CraigTheBrewer12 4d ago

Annoyingly though, the “starter packs” are always on offer in tesco so you get two refills plus the applicator for about a quid less than one refill on its own, but I don’t want to end up with a load of plastic applicators that will most likely get binned

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u/Altruistic_Tennis893 4d ago

Why not just use cistern blocks?

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u/MrLamper1 4d ago

Many people don't have a cistern designed to be opened with any regularity, usually a push button flush mounted in the lid - 3 flats in a row for me.

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u/Lessarocks 4d ago

Mine has the buttons on top but the lid just lifts off, no screws or anything.

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u/CiderChugger 4d ago

I have one of those and put the cistern blocks in. Damaged the rubber seals and caused a slow leak. Didn't notice till the water started dripping through the downstairs ceiling

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u/TortillaKillerFarts 3d ago

My toilet kept breaking, inlet and outlet valves, the washer, the flush button... Plumber recommended I stop using the cistern blocks as the chemicals are quite harsh and he suspected that they might be damaging the various components. Stopped using them and have had no issues since, touch wood.

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u/coinsntings 4d ago

I'm under 25 and I buy 'soapy cage thingy' (mainly cos my parents always seem to have one and monkey see monkey do)

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u/Corona21 4d ago

Are we just randomly werfenden German words into English now?

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u/account_not_valid 4d ago

It's the Zeitgeist.

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u/solebrother29 4d ago

Donaudampschiffkapitängesellschaft.

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u/Amaranyx 4d ago

Im 28, moved out at 18 and always used one, I didnt know other people didnt.

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u/GreatScotRace 4d ago

I’m 28, I currently have a “unicorn” one on my loo… it doesn’t change the colour of the water but it’s always a nice scent when you flush. Makes such a difference

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u/sparhawks7 4d ago

From b&m? I got one in the hope that it would make the water multicoloured, haven’t used it yet but I’m disappointed now

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u/Glum-Gap3316 4d ago

Yea, im worried about the state of OPs toilet.

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u/megwump 4d ago

Plenty of less wasteful ways to keep a loo clean!

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u/rongusodo 4d ago

It makes such a noticeable difference! Getting a lovely whiff of fresh soapy scent when you flush - brilliant. Sincerely, a 21 year-old, who is definitely a soapy cage thing advocate :D

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u/TheRealPatrick79 4d ago

Newspapers, never seen anyone under 50 reading them.

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u/joe2596 4d ago

Good. The Sun can get tae fuck

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u/nats4756 4d ago

And the daily mail

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u/AlfredNotSoGreat 3d ago

Unfortunately they now read the same ones online but get lured Into even worse propaganda, because some people don't get how the Internet and bias works.

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u/Fluffy_UK 4d ago

I'm under 50 and I sometimes read the free ones given away on London public transport. But I can't imagine many people paying for one.

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u/TheRecklessOne 4d ago

I get The Happy Newspaper delivered. It’s excellent.

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u/[deleted] 4d ago

I have the Financial Times delivered and I’m 24.

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u/DuckRebooted 4d ago

Out of interest (not being sarcastic) what's it actually about?

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u/[deleted] 4d ago edited 4d ago

Mostly Economic Analysis. Covers news too but tends to be unbiased.

Think of it as a rich boy Money Saving Expert.

I work in the financial sector so it’s handy to have a finger on the pulse, I don’t particularly recommend it and certainly not if you don’t have an employer footing the bill.

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u/DuckRebooted 4d ago

Cheers that's about what I expected, Certainly sounds useful in the financial sector

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u/MuffinFeatures 4d ago

I’m also not being sarcastic, but the clue is really in the title.

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u/MauriceDynasty 4d ago

It's just a really good newspaper that would rather report the news rather than blast opinion and only report one side of a story (unlike the telegraph and guardian do on opposite sides). Also good if you like to keep up with the global economy

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u/DrunkPunkRat 4d ago

I take the free ones when I need to paint something in the house.

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u/cbxcbx 4d ago

I used to take all the metros at the end of the day to line a ferret cage.

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u/marypoppets 4d ago

I'm crossing my fingers for "being too proud to apologise", computer illiteracy, pressuring women to have children, and sending letters (last one saddens me as it really is quite special).

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u/TinyLet4277 4d ago

computer illiteracy

Anecdotal from people I know who are teachers, and I've seen it written on Reddit too - computer illiteracy is actually massively on the rise among primary school students, as less and less people have a "home computer" and instead just have mobile devices.

Startling numbers of kids of primary school age have never seen an OS like Windows or MacOS or used a desktop computer. They don't know how to use a mouse, type on a physical keyboard, let alone use Office (or similar) programs or even basic computer operation.

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u/SCATOL92 4d ago

They have the tech addiction without the tech knowhow

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u/Jezbod 4d ago

As someone in tech support, at least I know my job is a bit safer.

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u/neo101b 4d ago

Not very CyberPunk of them.

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u/joe2596 4d ago

Strange being in my mid 20s, previous generation either knows IT really well or doesn't and the next generation doesn't because they are all hooked on Ipads.

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u/LordWarfire 3d ago edited 3d ago

Yep, elder millennial here and I suspect there’s about a 20 year window starting in about 1980 for births where tech skills are strong and you can fairly assume everyone has IT knowledge but before that and after that it’s a different story.

Plenty of 20 year olds I meet that have never used a mouse or saved a file on removable media.

I kind of hope I’m right because it means a career with limited people trying to steal my job!

Edit: plenty of comments have convinced me to move this window to 1975-1995, I’m mentally calling this the MS-DOS generation. You had a computer running DOS (I’ll allow early Windows that is DOS underneath) at home that you wanted to use but didn’t want to screw up.

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u/joe2596 3d ago

When you call yourself 'Elder Milennial' you sound like an Oblivion character.

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u/LordWarfire 3d ago

It’s mostly so I don’t have to say “old bastard, in Reddit years”

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u/Cannaewulnaewidnae 4d ago

computer illiteracy is actually massively on the rise among primary school students, as less and less people have a "home computer" and instead just have mobile devices

Hadn't occurred to me, but it makes sense

Even an X-Box, which is just a PC, is sort of hidden behind an interface that's only designed to let you buy stuff

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u/jjc-92 4d ago

Some of the students I've worked with (first or second year of uni age usually) recently are definitely more computer illiterate than I was at their age. Slower at typing, not familiar with keyboard shortcuts, apparently incapable of handling folder indexing in any sensible manner. Not all of course, but a rise in the use of tablets, phones and use of the more rigid OS's that we use these days are definitely having an affect.

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u/SiliSculptures 4d ago

There was a golden period of kids born in the late 90's and early 2000's that were young enough for home computers to be kinda commonplace but before the iphone and tablets became default. It's amazing how many of my friends simply don't own a pc and rely on their phone.

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u/Irrxlevance 3d ago

Definitely. I might not be perfect here but I feel like roughly 1990-2006 maybe 07 were that little golden age of children that grew up with home pc’s. Lately it seems to be a lot of ipadding and consoles.

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u/beetlegu 4d ago

It also has to do with not being taught these things. When my mum went to school she says they were taught touch typing. I was born in the 2000s and we never were, because it was assumed everyone already knew how to. We were never taught commands or shortcuts either, you’d have to personally seek these things out which most people won’t do.

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u/Soldarumi 4d ago

We are going through this with my 10 year old. She can't type unless it's with her thumbs or a stylus, and doesn't understand anything about desktop applications Vs phone/tablet apps. I know she's safe from browsing anything dodgy on the internet as trying to explain what a web address was too painful for me to keep at.

At her age, I was surfing the web unassisted, installing plenty of things I shouldn't have been and was busy experimenting with chatrooms, overclocking, talking to people across the globe and lord knows what else.

I admit, probably should have had a bit more parental oversight, but a lot of kids I know just don't seem curious in understanding what their tech can do beyond watching videos and using prebuilt apps.

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u/kipperfish 3d ago

I have a 10yo that I've always let mess about on my desktop, she's managed to install Sims mods by herself recently. including unzipping and putting the files in the right place. I'm quite proud of her because when her friends come over they seem to see the desktop as a weird magical box with two screens! One even asked why I have two tablets set up like that.

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u/thecuriousiguana 4d ago

Yep. I teach Computing. They're fine with Office and stuff, that's all pretty widely used.

But they literally have zero idea how to save a file in the right folder. None. They have no experience of or understanding file systems.

At the moment, they're using a programme installed on the computer. They instantly just fire up Chrome. They stare blankly when I tell them to click on the start menu/Windows menu.

They have to save images from online into a particular folder. Even once we've got going and they've already loaded stuff from that folder, they still just blindly click and it goes to downloads.

It's absolutely infuriating. Apple's obfuscation of the file system has killed computer literacy, arguably in favour of usability but definitely at the loss of general productivity and ability to navigate a computer.

It's even at the point where they struggle to name files. Because they don't have to do anything for it to save as Document47 or whatever, they just do that. No matter how much we bang on about it. Again, iOS does it all without user intervention.

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u/blinky84 3d ago

This is the thing that gets me! File systems, folder structure, appropriate file names. If it's not in the 'recently opened' list it may as well have vanished. And, like, to me as a Millennial it seems really intuitive, but at the same time, where is the knowledge base from which they would've acquired that intuition?

Sometimes I feel that it's like, we learned to write by learning to hold a pencil and practicing loops and lines before forming actual letters, and we were learning to read alongside that. Now, the younger generation, it's a though they learn to read, and then get taught to write by copying text without instilling the motor skills, phonetics, how to make the strokes of each letter.

There's a knowledge gap and it's frustrating, but it happens because we learned with the tech. When you look at computers from, say 1988 to 2002, that was a WILD ride. Essentially, not much has changed since then in terms of how we operate things. The things that were new were new to EVERYBODY in that period, and treated as such - Solitaire and Minesweeper were included with Windows to teach mouse control, after all. We expect kids to just have that whole journey already packaged. And we need to remember that it's just... not.

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u/TripleTongue3 4d ago

This, I'm a 67 year old doing tech support for my grandchildren.

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u/dblockmental 3d ago

Oh how the turns have tabled

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u/MumbleSnix 4d ago

Yes, very common for year 7’s not to know how to use a mouse! Some kids are surprised that the desktop monitor isn’t touch screen!

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u/THROWRA_babacji 4d ago

I'm in an entry to work training program as an adult so I mingle with 16yo's on the regular.

A large chunk of them prefer to write essays and assignments on phones even though we have free access to multiple computers and laptops in every room.

A computer is better in everyway than a phone but nope. Gotta use them thumbs.

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u/scottedward90 4d ago

IMO computer illiteracy is a problem in the younger generation but not in the way you'd think.

Although we've got more tech around us now, most of it is user friendly. I regularly have to teach under 25s how to use Windows because they've only ever used an Ipad.

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u/Enigma1984 4d ago

being too proud to apologise

I think this is every generation sorry.

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u/DeadBallDescendant 4d ago

computer illiteracy

I'm fucking ancient and I could knock you up a website in HTML in an afternoon, after I get back from the pub.

btw: That's never been my job,I just grew up with having to do it that way or paying someone a shit load to do it for me.

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u/SuperSpidey374 4d ago

Letter writing almost seems to have died out already.

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u/Episkma 4d ago

A friend and I decided to be pen pals as a way of practicing French. They were mostly letters of Google translated sentences that were probably gobbledygook, but was nice to do!

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u/Vyseria 4d ago

I'll follow this up with being married = children and children = being married. I once asked my dad what difference does it make if a loving committed couple have a kid as opposed to a loved wedded couple. My dad: the kid will find it confusing because of a different surname.

No...the kid will be fine. It the outdated attitudes that are the problem

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u/Ok-Consideration8864 4d ago

Giving a shit about whether a kid writes a thank you note when you send them a birthday present.

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u/RunawayPenguin89 3d ago

I nearly got into an argument this Christmas. My 4 year old was opening a present, asking who it was from and then saying thank you.

My nan asked if I was keeping track for a thank you note and I asked what the point was? He's just said thank you, in person, with a hug... how is a note better than that?

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u/Electrical_Mix_7167 3d ago

My mum used to make me call everyone to thank them for any cards or presents that I got. Was so awkward at like 7 years old "Hi Auntie, thanks for my card and £5" You're welcome. ........ "Ok, here's mum"

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u/nats4756 4d ago

I'll accept a text

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u/pink7362 4d ago

We’re mid-30s and our 6 year old wrote his Christmas thank you cards and posted them last week. Stamps cost a fortune now though!

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u/PureMatt 4d ago

Haha, never even thought of that. My niece and nephew don't send me thank you notes, though my sister normally sends me a WhatsApp video of them playing with presents/saying thanks.

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u/onegirlandhergoat 4d ago

Sending mass Christmas cards to everyone they've ever met and keeping track of who sends them one back.

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u/notreallifeliving 4d ago

I can't wait until physical cards, and the expectation of them, dies out entirely.

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u/read_r 4d ago

D: i love getting cards

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u/Sir_Marwood 3d ago

Me too. I love getting them. I still send and receive cards from many friends and family of varying ages at both Xmas and on Birthdays (I'm 35). It feels more personal than a text for people who mean something to me. It also feels nice when someone has took the time out to choose, write and post a card to me

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u/Unusual--Spirit 4d ago

I buy 1 Christmas card a year and it's for my Nana's as she is greatly offended if she doesn't get one.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

I do this, and I get cards back, and sometimes texts from people I haven't seen all year saying "it's so nice that you always remember Christmas cards!"

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u/ImperialYell 4d ago

Smoking I think will eventually.

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u/littlenymphy 4d ago

It'll be replaced by vaping first....then maybe if/when all the health issues that come along with vaping are discovered that will disappear too.

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u/jai_kasavin 3d ago

everyone's bodies are full of plastic, what will inhaling vegetable glycerine do

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u/Life_Purple235 3d ago

Vegetable you say? This means vaping is one of my 5 a day! Excellent news, thank you sir!

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u/MrStilton 4d ago

Vaping is on the rise though.

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u/TinyLet4277 4d ago

As smoking rates massively drop - it's often the only thing nicotine addicts can do instead of smoking. And all the evidence suggests so far it isn't deadly. Smoking is.

We should welcome vapes as a massive game changer in stopping people smoking. Just ban the awful disposable ones.

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u/zombiegirl_stephanie 4d ago

As someone who vapes, I agree, ban the shitty disposable ones 😤.

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u/Zavation 4d ago

Always wearing really smart shirts, jackets and trousers to just go walking / day activities.

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u/Forsythed 4d ago

I read an article about this! It’s not so much that old people dress smart, it’s actually just that they wear what they’ve always worn as adults. If you think of photos of your grandparents, chances are they’re wearing the same sort of thing that they do today. People settle into a style, and tend to stick with it regardless if it’s on or out of fashion. Certainly true for those who done have a keen interest in fashion.

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u/Boris_Johnsons_Pubes 4d ago

I know an old man that goes around wearing an extremely bright early 90s ski jacket, he settled for the 90s, you can see him from a mile off

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u/360Saturn 3d ago

Yes, similarly 'old lady hair' and things like the 'Karen' haircut are just the haircuts that were fashionable and trendy when those people were younger.

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u/Ok-Consideration8864 3d ago

Karen haircuts I totally get as that was a popular haircut in the late 90s/early 00s but old lady hair seems to have been the same from the 80s to now and there's no way 35 year olds in 1980 or 50 year olds in 2000 had that hair.

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u/Incandescent_Lass 3d ago

That’s because as they get older their hair thins, grows slower, and can’t handle longer styles and regular dyeing. So they go for something short-medium length and easy to style for their thin grey hair, which ends up usually being one of the “old lady” haircuts.

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u/SCATOL92 4d ago

I must admit that I love this! Imagine putting a tie and a nice crisply ironed shirt just to pop to tesco. I wouldn't do it but I think it's nice

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u/CaveGoose26 4d ago

Favourite thing about my dad is how impeccable he always looks. Wears a shirt, waistcoat and jacket even if he's just going grocery shopping or on a dog walk. I love it, mine and my brothers friends will always comment on how much they love it and his new waist coats etc. He's a snappy dresser my dad!

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u/willy_hangslow 4d ago

Ahh my grandad, got bless his soul. Always looked dapper as fuck even just to mow the lawn or take a jaunt down to Leeds market 😢

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u/SuperSpidey374 4d ago

I'm not sure, I see plenty of people my age (mid-20s) dressing up smart - often to differentiate themselves from other people of the same age who dress very casually. Sure, we're not going to get back to people wearing suits to their office jobs every day and things like that but some people will always like to dress smartly for everyday activities.

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u/MrStilton 4d ago

I have a neighbour who wears long sleaved shirts to do the gardening.

The practice just seems massively impractical to me.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

Not to be objectifying the wonderful men of r/AskUK, but if you wear a long-sleeved shirt while gardening, you can roll the sleeves up to just below your elbows and look sexy as hell.

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u/ExtremelyDubious 4d ago

Pretty sure it would take more than rolled-up sleeves to make some of us sexy.

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u/MintyMarlfox 4d ago

Cheques. Or at least using them in shops.

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u/[deleted] 4d ago

Good, they’re a massive pain.

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u/FlatCapNorthumbrian 4d ago

I think pretty much all shops have phased out accepting cheques as a form of payment now.

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u/alysmeganx 4d ago

I have literally never written a cheque 😂

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u/SML51368 4d ago Take My Energy

Hopefully being phobic- homophobic, transphobic, racist. Basically being intolerant of anyone and everyone.

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u/Essexboyz123 4d ago

None of the things you listed are the preserve of older people, they’ve been around for most of human existence…

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u/SML51368 4d ago

Perhaps I'm just optimistic that they will eventually die out?

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u/Essexboyz123 4d ago

They’ll be replaced with other things to irrationally hate people for, it’s human nature to fear the different unfortunately.

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u/joe2596 4d ago

Homophobia will probably die out as it should, heros like Alan Turing won't be forgotten & think as more and more people are not becoming as religious it's likely to become a non-issue.

I myself struggle to understand transgender(ism?) so I just tend not to engage.

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u/Kvovark 4d ago edited 3d ago

Would be nice to think that but I don't think it will. A relative in school (16 years old) came out as gay recently and she has since been called the absolute worst slurs you can think of by many at her school. All young people. None of them religious either. Just hateful/ignorant shitheads. Don't think we can get rid of it completely but we can control how we as a society respond to it.

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u/Cannaewulnaewidnae 4d ago

Basically being intolerant of anyone and everyone

You've sort of answered your own question there, though

When I (Gen-X) was a kid, we genuinely thought all we had to do was not be racist or hate gay people and we had won. Job done

Stuff like trans rights or diversity quotas weren't concepts we could have even got our heads around

There's never any Promised Land to get to, where everything's sorted once and for all

You're doing things right now that your kids will cringe at when you bore them with tales of the old days over Christmas dinner

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u/Luton_Enjoyer 4d ago

Unborn generations will think we're the homophobic ones.

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u/Confuseduseroo 4d ago

Or perhaps views based on life experience rather than harvested off social media.

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u/sadlibrarian 4d ago

Going to church

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u/DimensionPrudent1256 4d ago

I live in a white middle class suburb and the church is thriving here lmao. I've never seen anything like it. My whole neighbourhood is just old people.

Old folk round here go mad for tea and biscuit mornings

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u/RedButterfree1 3d ago

I mean, good for the elderly or simply those who feel like socialising. Loneliness is not a nice thing to experience.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

The one I go to is full of young people, (kids, teenagers, uni students, young single people)

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u/Namerakable 4d ago

Eating tripe. Some older people who grew up during rationing seem to have Stockholm Syndrome with offal.

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u/marypoppets 4d ago

If you go to an authentic Chinese restaurant, tripe ingredients are actually quite common and not seen as a last resort kind of food but something delicious. Try it out! It's not dying out anytime soon.

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u/Namerakable 4d ago

I've had things like horumon, and I used to regularly eat liver and beef tongue, so I know it can be delicious. But my grandma used to literally eat a big plate of white, unseasoned tripe and loved it. Cannot cope with that.

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u/ardy_trop 4d ago

Tripe's lovely. Just needs to be cooked properly, and long enough for it not to be rubbery. Traditional English recipe:

  1. Simmer in stock and onion for about an hour until soft
  2. Fry some flour in butter, add stock and 1 glass milk, whisk to make a sauce
  3. Add chopped tripe and onion, simmer for a few minutes more until sauce thickens
  4. Serve on toast with grated cheese
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u/charley_warlzz 4d ago

Elbows on the table while eating. Theres no real reason to dislike it, it comes from an old prejudice against sailors, and i think the newer generations are giving up on ‘pointless’ manners.

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u/Scaro88 3d ago

The stupid one for me is people caring what hand I hold the knife in.

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u/Destined4Americ 4d ago

Morris Dancing.

My dad is a morris dancer and they are massively struggling to recruit younger members to the group. He seems to enjoy the excuse to be somewhat active once a week… at a pub!

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u/animalwitch 4d ago

I think this is a family and regional thing. My MiL is part of a Morris group and there are two younger girls in it! She's also got her husband involved with the men's group.

If you have a family member involved i think its easier for young people to join, especially in bumfuck no where with nothing else to do lol

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u/CredentialsResisted 4d ago

I'm gen Z and I would love to be able to do Morris dancing for a hobby, but I live in the suburbs, so it isn't really accessible. Any sort of country dancing is great for people who always wanted to dance but lacked the flexibility and the money to join a ballet/contemporary/street dance class, so I wish schools etc made more of an effort to introduce people to it (my primary school ran a country club, but when I got to secondary, if you hadn't been doing dance/gymnastics since you could toddle, there was no place for you)

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u/SuperSpidey374 4d ago

Had a Morris dancing group near us shut down last week after 50 years.

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u/Budget-Cow-8256 4d ago

Recording is definitely one. My parents wanted a new TV so rang up Sky to enquire about the Sky Glass thing. They decided not to go with it on the basis that they couldn’t record programmes on it. The Sky guy and myself (on several occasions) tried to explain to them they can get everything on catch up apps, but it doesn’t sink in.

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u/[deleted] 4d ago

[deleted]

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u/ayeayefitlike 4d ago

Completely agree - we record live sport all the time, especially things like F1 which can be at weird times, or the other Six Nations fixtures when we’re at a game in person to watch later. Sport is often not available on catch up or with an option to start from beginning if you start watching late - record is a godsend.

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u/xclaireypopsx 4d ago

Yep this is what is stopping us from ditching our skyQ. BT Sport have a great app for watching sports but sky are shit. You have to wait for the highlights… meh. Let me watch it when I want to.

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u/LeGrandFromage9 4d ago

Can’t fast forward through adverts on streaming apps

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u/wonderland0613 4d ago

Exactly, rewatching anything on catch up other than bbc shows is a real pain!

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u/Slight-Lie-4305 4d ago

Recording allows you to skip ads which you cant do on catch up (ad block doesnt work everywhere)

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u/cosmicmeander 3d ago

Recording allows you to keep a film for 3 years when it was deleted from a streaming library after 3 months

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u/chalky2222 4d ago

State pensions

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u/Essexboyz123 4d ago

What’s wrong with Lard! I wouldn’t call myself old and I still keep a block in the fridge for my fried-bread.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

I have lard in the fridge - mostly for pastry, roast potatoes and Yorkshire pudding

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u/Past-Educator-6561 4d ago

Literally never used it in my life. It's used for hot crust pastry though if I'm not wrong... So can't see it dying out completely!

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u/Essexboyz123 4d ago

Fried bread can only be made correctly with Lard, the vegetable alternatives haven’t got the flavour.

Lard is also a pretty healthy fat, it’s got lots of monounsaturated fatty acids (only beaten by Olive Oil) and tons of Vitamin D.

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u/Mumstheword76 4d ago

I use half lard, half butter when making roast potatoes.

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u/thefragile- 4d ago

Soaps (Eastenders, Corrie, etc.)

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u/[deleted] 4d ago

Fucking about time, they’re on version 18 of the same fucking murder.

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u/barrenvagoina 4d ago

Not sure about that, there’s fairly big communities of people on social media to talk about Eastenders, and I think it’s fair to say they skew on the younger side. Not sure about other soaps though

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u/Bigtuna515 4d ago

Travel agents. I don't go round town much but today I did and I couldn't believe travel agents still exist! There were customers in there, 3 very old couples.

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u/Diocletion-Jones 4d ago

I'd never used a travel agent until a couple of years ago but a joint family holiday involved me using one. I'm extremely lazy so finding out there was someone who you could just sit and chat with for half an hour and then they go off an come up with all the holiday options and then you say yes or no to things and then they book it all and just e-mail you all the information at the end as a completed package was amazing. It's like having a personal assistant do all the research and leg work. There's probably an app now that does the same thing as a travel agent where you put the information into a form and then it generates an itinerary, but I'm sold on using a travel agent in the future.

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u/simple-potato-farmer 4d ago

Big agree here. Tell them your rough budget and particular ideas for where you want to go and do and they come back with a list of place, plans for the hotels and flights. Deals for discounts at hotels and just general save pain in the ass with planning holidays

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u/Fairybite 4d ago

Landlines and thimbles

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u/SuperSpidey374 4d ago

Landline one frustrates me as they can come in handy, especially in areas with poor internet/mobile reception. Reception in our flat (in a city!) isn't great, and we often have issues when using mobiles on calls - but never any issues with the landline.

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u/pirateluke 4d ago

Turn on wifi calling?

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u/SCATOL92 4d ago

I sew and do other hand crafts and I genuinely have no clue what a thimble is meant for

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u/LadyAilla 4d ago

You put it on whichever finger you use for the underneath guide, more common in fine detailed sewing like lace work and embroidery. It was mainly designed to stop ladies ruining their fingers or looking unseemingly but most importantly not getting blood drop of very expensive material where it can't be washed out easily like silk.

Theyre a bit cumbersome to get use to but saved me a fair few tears.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

Also, for basically the complete opposite - pushing a needle through very thick canvas or leather, to protect your finger.

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u/Inner-Thing321 4d ago

Looking legitimately old when you reach mid life - retirement.

I swear as a kid growing up in the 1980s/90s, sixty year olds looked like today's eighty year olds

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u/minipainteruk 3d ago

I swear as a kid growing up in the 1980s/90s, sixty year olds looked like today's eighty year olds

Yes! I wonder if this is because people tend to find a style and stick with it, or if it's because people just didn't take as good care of themselves (no moisturiser, harsher living conditions, etc). I wonder what kids today who have skincare routines at 13 and practise self-care will look like when they're middle aged.

Slightly off topic but I hope worrying about aging will become a thing of the past. You shouldn't be taught to erase all visible proof you've lived. Not all of us make it to 50,60, etc. We should celebrate age instead of being sad about it.

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u/AlpineJ0e 4d ago

The phrase "Our generation built this country"

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u/[deleted] 4d ago

You spelt ruined wrong

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u/scottedward90 4d ago

Tattoo prejudice

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u/Shevyshev 4d ago

I’m thinking that tattoo prejudice has a renaissance. Tatts will be woefully uncool in about 20-25 years, when all of today’s twenty and thirty somethings have kids in their teens.

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u/jollygreenbinbag 3d ago

If we're to take any stock of the belief that children will almost always rebel against their parents, then tattoo prejudice may be ripe for a resurgence in the next few decades.

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u/saladinzero 4d ago

Indoor and outdoor bowls. I would be amazed if there's enough people interested in joining to keep a club going in (what seems like) every suburb of Glasgow, let alone nationwide.

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u/MrStilton 4d ago

Did old people do that throughout their lives though? I always thought it was something which most people only take up when they reach old age, as it's a sport you can take part in when you have reduced mobility and age related infirmities.

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u/IHoppo 4d ago

The 2 bowls clubs near me both have bars. My mates and I are planning on joining when we retire.

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u/sir-diesalot 4d ago

The inability to engage with technology. I’m 50 in a month and I’m the generation who had the first computers in school, The beginning of the internet etc.

All the generations below me have the net as an intrinsic, inseparable part of their lives from birth. I’ve made a conscious effort to keep my older relatives up to speed as the world at large expects a base level of integration they just don’t have

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u/JT_3K 4d ago

Yeah, but tech ability is declining. I’m around a decade younger than you and we’re similar. Your generation had to code your own stuff if you wanted to use it and understand how to cable it together if you wanted something fancy. I’m just on the cusp of people that needed to understand modem initialisation strings and acoustic couplers if you wanted to get on the early internet.

Because the post-1995 generation hasn’t had to re-optimise their Autoexec to get Doom to load or dick about with early 802.11b or a cheap 56k PCI softmodem in Win 98SE in order to survive, I’m seeing more and more people who struggle with basic tech when an issue comes up. I’m not throwing shade: it’s great that modern iPads and so on work so flawlessly and offer a boundless connectivity experience whilst managing the hardware so well. It’s just that because users are increasingly able to do fantastic things without the complexity, few choose to look under the hood.

Mind you, I suppose a number of your generation bitch about me not having to use Peek/Poke and arse about directly manipulating the registers in order to do a half-decent program

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u/Rap-oleon_Bonaparte 4d ago

I record tv to watch later, its very handy for the swathes of non demand tv.

I dont think young people watch tv at all so I guess im an outlier regardless, my friend was telling me the other day that in his house they all just have a laptop or tablet each and sometimes to watch as a family they all get together around the same laptop, which frankly sounds a bit tragic.

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u/AshFraxinusEps 4d ago

sometimes to watch as a family they all get together around the same laptop

Have you not suggested an HDMI cable from the laptop to the TV?

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u/SCATOL92 4d ago

Homeownership

Hitting children

Landline phones

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u/46Vixen 4d ago

Why does recording TV make me old? WHat am I supposed to do if I want to watch a thing that I'm not available for live?

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u/AprilBelle08 4d ago

I record a lot of things, so I can skip through the adverts

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u/SevitahMoon 4d ago

Ironing I'm 34f and refuse to iron

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u/snowmanseeker 4d ago

State pensions and the retirement age.

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u/Admiral_Eversor 4d ago

Every time I look at the tax on my payslip and my pension contributions, it fucking boils my piss to know that I'll never see any benefit from it. Feels like a fucking rug pull, man. We'll be paying into the pension system our whole working lives, and told to get fucked when it's our turn.

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u/Maleficent_Ad_1516 4d ago

A sad reality is opera. I don’t particularly care for it but watching an art form become almost obsolete is hard

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u/SuperSpidey374 4d ago

Really? From what I see in the UK, we still have several thriving opera companies and their attempts to get younger people in are, at the very least, not unsuccessful.

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u/LionLucy 4d ago

I have friends who go regularly, I think it's always been fairly niche but there's a dedicated audience for it.

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u/Soldarumi 4d ago

My partner's father came up with a good one today, seeing as it's one of his favourite hobbies - stamp collecting.

He says it's becoming a chore to trade stamps, as almost everyone he knows that's into it, from professional to hobbyist, keeps dying. He talks about how, once upon a time, he would walk into a stamp shop in one part of London, then flip it at another if he thought he could turn a profit.

These days, he says all the shops are closed down, and it's mostly big lot auctions where families are selling a dead relative's collection. The days of just sort of trading a few around with people are gone, apparently.

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u/robertodurian 4d ago

Carpet toilet seat covers, carpet toilet roll covers, tea cosies.

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u/Thekingofchrome 4d ago

banging on about the war

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u/Affectionate-Cost525 4d ago

Especially by people that weren't even born until 15 years after it ended...

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u/parabolicurve 4d ago

Not committing suicide to be a burden on friends and family.

After the NHS came into being in the forties. A large number of old people were choosing to take their own life rather than become a burden on their families. When the NHS became a thing, the amount of old people killing themselves for this reason dropped to practically zero.

Now with the recent proposal that people should pay for doctors appointments the privatisation of the NHS seems just around the corner.

At least we live in an era where suicide pods exist. So it's not all bad. Right?

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u/Underwritingking 4d ago

The NHS came into being in July 1948.

Suicide rates in the UK were falling well before that

https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/39/6/1464/736597

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u/GamerGodPWNDU 4d ago

Roast potatoes cooked in lard are the bomb, lard will never die.

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u/Turbulent-Tip-8372 4d ago

The purchase of A-Z street directories. I swear my parents are the only people that use these. My dad insists my mum use it in the passenger seat when he’s driving hire cars with sat navs.

Also keto peeps will probably keep lard alive, especially as it’s gaining ground as a far better diet to control diabetes than the standard food pyramid low fat high carb that keeps people sick.

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u/1SavageOne1 4d ago

My dad leaves at 4am to get to an 8.30 appointment 2 hours away. That's just strange, getting up at 3

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u/Zexy_Killah 4d ago

Oh my god my parents do this as well. Got a dinner reservation at 7pm a 5min drive away? Better leave the house at 6.15pm to make sure we're there on time, then moan that the table isn't ready when they arrive 40mins early.

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u/SkynetProgrammer 4d ago

Falling out with a friend of 60 years over something trivial and never speaking to them again.

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u/Hungry-Engine-2996 4d ago

Keeping a diary. I read an interesting piece by historians talking about how it's such a good resource that we probably won't have in a hundred years.

People now record their feelings digitally, often in proprietary formats and stored on company servers. Betting that Google or Microsoft will still be around in a hundred years and looking after your documents isn't a sure thing. How much data will be lost because the last person who knew the password has died of old age and they used strong encryption?

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u/Greater_good_penguin 4d ago

Being able to retire in confidence, knowing that your costs will be covered by a pension till you die

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u/alysmeganx 4d ago

Answering the phone by saying their own phone number, my dads only in his 60s but has staunchly done this forever. Does anyone know where it actually started? I'd be interested to know.

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u/Key_Lecture6007 4d ago

Thinking of my granny...

  1. Peeling vegetables on the back steps having a natter with the neighbours. Did you see the state of his curtains? Ah know...ah was black-affronted for him!
  2. Bingo halls.
  3. Spending at least fifteen minutes standing and chatting to pals on street corners whilst studiously ignoring or glaring at younger people.
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u/smmky 4d ago

Church on a Sunday

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u/lady_Monica 3d ago Table Slap

Using talcum powder after a bath.

My 96 year old mum’s bedroom looks like 50 Coke dealers have been bagging up 🤣🤣

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u/conejoloco2020 3d ago

I recently read an article about "third places" dying out. People have work and home, but no third place to hang out and make friends. This is especially true for men.

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u/simple-potato-farmer 4d ago

Those fancy porcelain dolls from companies like Coalport, Royal Doulton etc. They get donated where I work all the time but take ages to sell because the customer base is largely dying

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